Skip to content

Sincerity or Hypocrisy?

Stay in the loop!

Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.

Recent Comments

Subscribe

Sincerity or Hypocrisy

Sincerity or Hypocrisy?

September 19, 2019

Sincerity makes the very least person to be of more value than the most talented hypocrite. –Charles Spurgeon

I confess. Growing up as an unbeliever, I classified most Christians as hypocrites. My judgement extended even to my believing friends. 

To be honest, I often felt judged by them because my family did not go to church, I didn’t know the stories in the Bible, I didn’t pray… 

Sadly, the lives of most of my Christian friends did not differ substantially from mine. My family, while unbelieving, did adhere to a certain code of ethics which resembled Christian values. My parents taught me integrity, honesty and a strong work ethic. Although my believing friends claimed to hold themselves to a higher standard, their lives did not always reflect their beliefs. In hindsight I can attribute this to their youth and humanity. 

But at the time, I used their “hypocrisy” to dismiss Christianity. I sincerely believed I would never become a Christian.

Years later, after the Lord orchestrated certain events which led me to Him, I embraced the faith I once swore I would never own. 

Remembering my own challenges in becoming a Christian, I resolved to never be a hypocrite. I simply did not want to hinder anyone from seeing Jesus.

Almost immediately, I faced a challenge. Presented with an opportunity to share my new-found faith with someone, I waffled. I knew the right thing to do. My problem? I didn’t want to do it. I felt tired, shy, and … a bit baffled.

I sincerely believed since the Holy Spirit lives inside of me, I would always desire to do what is right. I honestly did not know how to react.

If I didn’t speak up, would I be sinning? If I did speak up, would I be insincere? A hypocrite even? Should I be sincere and honest enough to say, “I don’t really feel like doing this. But I know I should talk to you about Jesus right now. So, I am going to do it anyway…”?

Fortunately, a friend helped me make sense of the situation. Yes, when we don’t do the right thing, we sin:

If anyone, then, knows the good they ought to do and doesn’t do it, it is sin for them. (James 4:17 NIV)

She referred to this as the sins of omission. She encouraged me to always do what is right, but then to pray for my heart to change. 

Over the years, I found the following Scripture to ring true in situations like these:

For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. (Matthew 6:21 NIV)

My treasures in this world often consist of my time and energy. When I pour my time and effort into doing what is right, my heart always responds. Even in those times when I don’t “feel” like obeying, choosing to obey anyway is the first step to changing my heart. Praying for my heart completes the transformation.

That day, my friend shared with me a saying that has guided me well over the years: 

It’s never wrong to do what’s right.

Whenever I face moments like these, I resolve to do what is right, and then to pray for my heart. Wherever you are in your journey, I pray you are able to do the same.

Sincerity or Hypocrisy?

September 19, 2019

Sincerity or Hypocrisy

Sincerity makes the very least person to be of more value than the most talented hypocrite. –Charles Spurgeon

I confess. Growing up as an unbeliever, I classified most Christians as hypocrites. My judgement extended even to my believing friends. 

To be honest, I often felt judged by them because my family did not go to church, I didn’t know the stories in the Bible, I didn’t pray… 

Sadly, the lives of most of my Christian friends did not differ substantially from mine. My family, while unbelieving, did adhere to a certain code of ethics which resembled Christian values. My parents taught me integrity, honesty and a strong work ethic. Although my believing friends claimed to hold themselves to a higher standard, their lives did not always reflect their beliefs. In hindsight I can attribute this to their youth and humanity. 

But at the time, I used their “hypocrisy” to dismiss Christianity. I sincerely believed I would never become a Christian.

Years later, after the Lord orchestrated certain events which led me to Him, I embraced the faith I once swore I would never own. 

Remembering my own challenges in becoming a Christian, I resolved to never be a hypocrite. I simply did not want to hinder anyone from seeing Jesus.

Almost immediately, I faced a challenge. Presented with an opportunity to share my new-found faith with someone, I waffled. I knew the right thing to do. My problem? I didn’t want to do it. I felt tired, shy, and … a bit baffled.

I sincerely believed since the Holy Spirit lives inside of me, I would always desire to do what is right. I honestly did not know how to react.

If I didn’t speak up, would I be sinning? If I did speak up, would I be insincere? A hypocrite even? Should I be sincere and honest enough to say, “I don’t really feel like doing this. But I know I should talk to you about Jesus right now. So, I am going to do it anyway…”?

Fortunately, a friend helped me make sense of the situation. Yes, when we don’t do the right thing, we sin:

If anyone, then, knows the good they ought to do and doesn’t do it, it is sin for them. (James 4:17 NIV)

She referred to this as the sins of omission. She encouraged me to always do what is right, but then to pray for my heart to change. 

Over the years, I found the following Scripture to ring true in situations like these:

For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. (Matthew 6:21 NIV)

My treasures in this world often consist of my time and energy. When I pour my time and effort into doing what is right, my heart always responds. Even in those times when I don’t “feel” like obeying, choosing to obey anyway is the first step to changing my heart. Praying for my heart completes the transformation.

That day, my friend shared with me a saying that has guided me well over the years: 

It’s never wrong to do what’s right.

Whenever I face moments like these, I resolve to do what is right, and then to pray for my heart. Wherever you are in your journey, I pray you are able to do the same.

2 Comments

  1. Charla on September 27, 2019 at 6:27 AM

    Your friend imparted godly wisdom – which is the only true wisdom – long ago. As you shared so well, wisdom imparted can still be neglected. Praise God for His mercy and patience while we learn 🙂

    • Shirley Desmond Jackson on September 29, 2019 at 3:56 PM

      Thank you Charla! Yes, she certainly did. This lesson is one I have carried with me over the years and it has always steered me well.💕

Leave a Comment